Of Waterfalls, Sunflowers, and Breezes

Written for:  Imaginary Gardens With Real Toads – Wordy Thursday with Wild Woman:  “Hannah’s Boomerang Metaphor Form”
Some time back, in 2014, our Toad-friend Hannah Gosselin created an interesting form that I like very much, called the Boomerang Metaphor Form. She began with the “This poem is – ” format, and added some intriguing features, in which the first statements are expanded in separate stanzas, and then boomerang around to be repeated at the end. Here is the premise, as described by Hannah:

Boomerang Metaphors

* Create three, “This poem is a ____,” statements.

* Support each statement in separate stanzas, (one can choose the length of the supporting stanzas and whether or not to rhyme or employ free verse).

* Restate the statement that’s being supported in the last line of these supporting stanzas, (as mini boomerang metaphor refrains).

* Then name the list of three, “This poem is a _____,” statements again as a boomerang metaphors closing refrain.

Note: One may choose to state the closing refrain slightly morphed but mostly the same. As it seems, words that go out into the world do tend to come back touched – slightly transformed.

* The title encapsulates the three listed elements, “This Poem is a ____, ____ and a _____”

downloaddownload-3images-7

This poem is a waterfall
sliding down mountain walls
in sunshine.

This poem is a sunflower
opening its eye to greet summer.

This poem is a breeze
fluttering leaves
on a sycamore tree.

This poem trickles tickles
my nose with water mist,
watches couples kiss,
and make a wish.
This poem is a waterfall
sliding down mountain walls
in sunshine.

This poem boasts brilliant
pineapple petals framing
a chocolate velvet eye.
Catches sun, bending
in the breeze, having fun.
This poem is a sunflower
opening its eye to greet summer.

This poem flit-flies between
leaves and flowers in
garden bowers, encouraging dance.
This poem is a breeze
fluttering leaves
on a sycamore tree.

This poem is a waterfall
sliding down mountain walls,
splashing on rocks, so small.

This poem is a sunflower
raising its lashed eye
toward sun, praising.

This poem is a breeze
fluttering with ease
through the sycamore’s leaves.

http://withrealtoads.blogspot.com/

About purplepeninportland

I am a freelance poet, born and bred in Brooklyn, New York. I live with my husband, John, and two charming rescue dogs–Marion Miller and Murphy. We spent eight lovely years in Portland, OR, but are now back in New York. My goal is to create and share poetry with others who write, or simply enjoy reading poetry. I hope to touch a nerve in you, and feel your sparks as well.
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19 Responses to Of Waterfalls, Sunflowers, and Breezes

  1. This poem is very beautiful, filled with glorious colour, spilling down the page like a poetic waterfall itself. So lovely, Sara. Thank you so much for writing for my prompt. I absolutely love this!

    Like

  2. Margaret Elizabeth Bednar says:

    fluttering…. through the sycamore’s leaves. Love that image of a poem!

    Like

  3. oldegg says:

    Reading this I wishI could go walking in the wild places once more, (but sadly my legs refuse). What a beautiful picture your words painted here.

    Like

  4. kim881 says:

    I really like the ‘waterfall sliding down mountain walls in sunshine’, Sara – what an image with which to start a poem! I also enjoyed the sounds in the lines:
    ‘This poem trickles tickles
    my nose with water mist,
    watches couples kiss,
    and make a wish.’

    Like

  5. This poem trickles down my poetic heart and mind, Sara…thank you do much for your beautiful imagery!! ❤

    Like

  6. sanaarizvi says:

    This poem is utterly gorgeous and a work of art!! ❤️

    Like

  7. Jim says:

    Well, Sarah, you started off right with me, you couldn’t go wrong ever with “This poem is a sunflower..” Your word play is catchy and used just right, trickles tickles and flit-flies infuses action where there isn’t much. That and along with occasional rhyming effectively increase more tense reader attention. At least this reader. Thank you, it goes smoothly..
    ..

    Like

  8. Helen says:

    This poem is ….. a drink of fresh water, sheets blowing in the breeze, beautiful.

    Like

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